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a soft landing. then what about europe? i've seen some people touting europe. if you look at the financial fear indicators in europe, that crisis is basically over. >> well, yes, it is. i don't know if you can capture in the frame on the camera. what i'm doing here, i'm patting myself on the back. who is it who's been telling your viewers for two years every time there's one of these trumped-up crises in europe to buy it. now there's been a solution. europe has been stabilized. it's actually the brightest place for investors on the planet. i'm sorry you missed the bottom but it's not too late. you look at after hearing that segment on the u.s. government making the decision to debase paper coins by turning them into -- paper money by turning them into junk disposable paper coins? well what would you rather own? the ten-year american bond, treasury bond yielding what, 1.6%? or would you rather have a spanish bond denominated in the strongest currency in the world, the euro, paying 5.5%? i'll take spain over the united states at this point any day. >> all right. >> so don't
hikes, europe's grand experiment with taxing the rich more is falling apart, especially in france and britain. and here at home, california and new york are passing through the 50% tax rate barrier. is anybody looking at how tax hikes fail the test of economic growth? >>> back here in the u.s., could it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent pr
of uncertainty. so you have china engineering a soft landing and starting to recover. you have europe away from the brink. greece got upgraded today. who would have thought it. that is what the market is looking at. saying okay. it is not going to be the worst kcase sharcenario, but you coul extend the middle class tax cuts and be done with it. it is in a recession. >> and i think the market would not like that very much. everybody is expecting that you get the middle class tax cuts done. >> and if you can get china and europe doing better. it is hard to be terribly bearish on the u.s. >> y are going to stay with our politico expert. this is a rally that has surprised experts. it hasn't been that easy to be optimistic. >> it is. i think you have to be cautious here. the probability that this could fall apart is very, very real. >> so, you have to be careful up at these levels as a trader. i have low exposure up here. i have protection. that is how you have to play this market. stay with us please. >> yesterday it looked like washington was inching towards a deal. but today, plan b could be sign
kinds of europe stuff. all anybody wants is fiscal cliff resolution. >> did the fed spook anybody yesterday? >> no, i don't think so. i really think what sold off yesterday is people were just concerned about the fiscal cliff again. the fed didn't really do anything. they put kindleing on the fire, if we get a fiscal cliff, there's an awful lot of money out there to get this market going. >> it just strikes me that a central bank now $85 billion new dollars per month into the financial system and buying treasuries to hold rates down, they're not going to let rates go up any. i just intuit that. >> no. there was some talk that perhaps what they signaled was higher rates sooner than 2015 and i think that's absolutely wrong. there's no way. this was an easing policy. they're putting more money into the system. they're not going to let rates go up any sooner than they need to. after most recession, they don't really raise rates until 18 months after. so i think 2017 is probably your number. >> 2017. all right. let me just ask you about some other stuff. japan rising. europe stocks doi
a smaller place. we supported the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> so is president obama's labor relations board biased on behalf of big labor and their union bosses? that's the consensus of the new congressional report. joining us now is house oversight chairman, republican darrell issa of california. chairman issa, as always, welcome, sir. the headline story here is that the nlrb is bias in favor of unions and their bosses. that's not a shocking headline. but i just wanted to hear some of your key points. what's your most important point in your investigation? >> i think one of the most important discoveries was that there were inappropriate rule violations, what they call ex parte discussions that went on where you actually have the p
appreciate it. ? thank you. >> europe's fiscal woes dominated the american markets most of the year. >> the fragile european economy not out of the woods just yet. here is jimmy pathakukas of the institute. it was "barron's" just this week. this is the year to invest in europe. do you disagree with that or can the two work together? >> well, you know, they say the united states don't fight the fed. in europe you would say don't fight the ecb as long as they believe that they would do whatever it takes to keep the euro together, i guess that's a positive, but remember, you have an economy back in recession that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how shoul
, china, europe, whatever, the s&p 500 up 12.1% year to date. that is a good year. that is an optimistic year. why is that? >> it seems like we're forgetting about that, doesn't it? with all this talk about what's happening going forward and concern about corporate growth. and truly, we're concerned about corporate growth as well because there really hasn't been that long-term information from our government, from our policyholde policyholders, no economic policy in real investment in assets that we've seen. that's going to be a problem going forward, not to mention the global slowdown, and we're hitting the top of corporate profits now. >> so you don't agree with this. you're turning bearish. >> not bearish in a sense of going forward intermittently. we think that most likely, we're going to see some growth hitting in the second quarter of next year. until we get through this fiscal cliff nonsense, until we see some growth coming out of china and europe, i think that -- >> china i think is showing growth. europe may not show growth in my lifetime, but they're going to be bailed out. do
people have to talk about the fact that essentially all these attacks in both the u.s. and europe are currently where guns are banned. >> we appreciate your perspective tonight. >> in the wake of friday's shooting in newtown, will the gun history face legal troubles like the tobacco companies did one time? mary thompson tackles that area. good evening, mary. >> good evening, joe. given the ongoing investigation into the rampage that killed 20 children and 6 adults, it's premature to say what legal action might be taken. when and if it is, it won't be an easy task. the 2005 protection of lawful commerce and arms acts pro secretaries manufacturerss are distributors and dealers from liability if others their probably. this makes it virtually impossible to seek damages from the gun history. another option is suing if the dealer was founding to negligent in selling the gun and if there are signs of negligence in the gunies design. you could argue that added safety features are needed. a feature like say an authorization technology in a would prevent someone from being used by someone o
of the biggest unions larry. he said in western europe, they may have higher unemployment but they have less inequality. this is what the agenda is all about. in a practical way, suppose you have a successful person. he or she want to build a house. to do that you might hire 15, 20, 25 people. you got a whole army of people who would go to work. but if you get taxed, you might not guy that house. and you won't build. that is the kind of logic i'm not hearing. dow think they get that? >> they don't. i saw lincoln. remember during the debate in 2008 charlie gibson asked the then president obama why raise capital gains? he said it is about social justice and fairness. it doesn't matter that it doesn't work. what counts to these people is class and attacking this rich guy and this poor person who doesn't have much money. but the guy is on the margin of poverty. would love to go to work as a landscaper in this hypothetical home that i am describing. the guy on the margin, they would love to work like that. so, there is a connection there and i don't see why washington our friends on the democrati
're getting cool in the later years. >> all right, zach, let's move on. first of all europe's stocks are having are very good run. in fact stocks almost all around the world are having a very good run. they ain't doing too badly here in the usa. fiscal cliff or not. what do you make of that? >> first of all, we obviously see these things in terms of one-year period. if you add up january 1 of 2011 through let's say december 31st, 2012, a two-year period, let's say the markets end up a little bit more they're still going to be up about 8% annualized for two years. which is a really good compared to 1 1/2% on a 10-year note. but hardly what you would call this massive bull market a la the 1990s and 1980s. >> it's nice. but zach, if i could have had 8% a year for the last 15 years, you have to be in better shape than how i actually am. in the last 15 years it hasn't done anything. >> i think this is a testament to the fact the only game in town, you do talk about this a lot, larry, is that companies are net net relative to national economies better run and making money. so if you're goi
. the only place you have it is overseas. europe looks stable compared to the u.s. right now what does that say about our dysfunctional system? it says our dysfunction is our competitor's advantage in this market and that is sad. >> amen to larry. that was well said. i don't think i can add anything. >> for the average investor watching right now, any advice? >> no. i think that what's going to happen is there will be refl reflexive knee-jerk reaction higher if one of those two things i said happen. the market was up quite a bit since mid-november. the small-cap his been up 9.5% until the sell-off and they'd given a lot of that back, but there was a lot of good feelings priced in, and to me it's not that awful for us to take some of that off. i think the next month will be choppy and whipsaw, but 2013, there are a lot of good things going, housing market, china, japan. i would buy some things. >> guys, got to cut you off. larry, you'll get more time next time, promise. see you later, jim. >>> we're all over the fiscal fiasco. tune in to cnbc this sunday night. yep, we're working the we
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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